Switzerland in breast Looking big today for

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Today's posts · Mark forums read · Send new message Has anyone gotten tested for breast cancer around the Basel area, and .. Thanks for looking out for me I wouldn't like to go direct for a test, and No worries though, a very large quantity of these are completely benign, but it's always smart to check. Switzerland looks set to halt routine breast screening, yet in the UK a review of the same Today's programme is all about screening for breast cancer. . The two biggest sources of variation, apart from what's going on in the head of the writer. Some women feel their breasts look excessively large in proportion to their figure. A breast reduction combined with other corrections can resolve problems such.

Instead, more smaller lesions were being detected.

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Jorgensen suspects that the tumors that cause advanced disease tend to grow grow so quickly — in between the yearly mammograms — that they are already advanced by the time the screening occurs. They pop up between screening rounds. The data does not suggest that screening should be abandoned, but instead reflects the fact that screening, as it exists today in much of the world, is outdated.

(PDF) BRCA1/2 mutations in Swiss patients with familial or early-onset breast and ovarian cancer

Switzerland in breast Looking big today for Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study. Screening can clearly be helpful in detecting and treating disease before it becomes advanced and untreatable — some of the drop in breast cancer deaths can be attributed to screening.

But mammography may not be best way to do that. In fact, some researchers argue that much of the decline in breast cancer deaths should be traced to better treatments rather than primarily to screening with mammography.

They say that breast cancer deaths should be going down further, given the widespread education and implementation of screening and treatments in most parts of the world. But in order to accomplish that, additional screening tests, such as a blood test or genetic evaluations, may be needed. Brawley points to colon cancer screening as a model. It is lowering death rates and leading to a drop in the number of advanced disease. The breast cancer findings also point to another flaw in existing screening strategies.

They are built on centuries-old definitions of cancer and equally unchanged views on how best to treat them. Back then all tumorous growths were assumed to be fast-growing and potentially lethal, and therefore needed to be removed. Our knowledge of cancer biology tells us that breast cancer represents a spectrum of really different cases of cancer that behave Switzerland in breast Looking big today for very different ways.

And sadly screening is not good at picking up those cancers that we really want to pick up. Brawley agrees, but points out that we are not yet ready to accept that some breast cancers may not need treatment. Are you heavily invested in screening like the NHS? Or are you concerned that the risks are being underestimated? Such bias exerts a subtle effect, but one even the most scrupulous researchers recognise.

Or, to put it another way, if you torture statistics enough they can often be made to tell you what you want. We differ from most of the other charities in as much as we do not actively promote the screening programme.

What we actively promote, as a cancer charity, a breast cancer charity, is informed choice for women. So it has to be biased, so we would not promote NHS screening. I completely agree that there needs to be informed choice about screening. And I think there are two — those changes are two fold Switzerland in breast Looking big today for could be made. To me the big problem is that the NHS programme is judged on how many women attend, not on how many women made a good informed choice about whether they want to attend or not.

I think the issue of uncertainty is being overplayed. So the second issue is well treatment may have improved and that argument was certainly put to the panel that I chaired and we looked at it.

But the argument was put both ways because treatments improved that might make screening more effective or it might make screening unnecessary. And overwhelmingly — overwhelmingly the reduction in mortality given a breast cancer incident that has in Tiruchirappalli Prostitute has been because of improvements in treatment, no question about it.

The benefit of screening pales by comparison with the benefit of improvements in treatment. So you have to be absolutely honest with those women and say that this is a balance of risks. Well no there is such a trial in England at the moment which is extending screening two or three years Switzerland in breast Looking big today for than 50 and three or four years older than And that decision what it will be will be, you should be allowed to choose not to have it, just as you can be allowed to choose at present times to have the screening.

Nikola, as an ethicist, where do you stand — would you put yourself forward for screening if you were invited?

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice. Sign in to the BBC, or Register. Screening for Breast Cancer Inside Health. Available now 28 minutes. Wed 16 Jul Ebola, Bike saddles, Recording consultations, Insect bites. Statins, Cholesterol-lowering spreads, Olive oil, Diet and inflammatory Switzerland in breast Looking big today for disease, Singers' nodules. Programme Transcript - Inside Health.

Breast Reduction

Porter What have you seen that our Switzerland in breast Looking big today for might not have? Porter Professor Susan Bewley who is in the minority — around three quarters of women in the UK do take up their invitation to be screened - nearly two million every year in England alone.

Porter But do women still think the same today? We have assembled a group of experts with differing perspectives to debate the issue: Biller-Andorno The medical board looked at the existing literature, the same literature that was looked at by different countries, in the UK, in the Netherlands, etc. Porter Michael Marmot, you looked at similar data to the Swiss Medical Board when you carried out a recent review here in the UK and yet that review came to a different decision.

Marmot Well we looked at Switzerland in breast Looking big today for the questions that Nikola has just addressed and we did indeed come to a different decision. Porter But are you confident, looking at the age groups that we screen here in the UK, the current programme, that your figure of less than women need to be screened to save one death is accurate?

Marmot I think it is as accurate as we can get given all the usual caveats and one of those important caveats is that these trials were done a long time ago and some of the experts who gave this evidence said we cannot base current policy on trials that were done one decade, Switzerland in breast Looking big today for decades, even three decades ago.

Porter Margaret McCartney, listening to Michael and Nikola, two comprehensive reviews there that have come to a different decision.

Martin

McCartney Yeah well the problem is because the treatments for breast cancer can incur some harms, that means that you may die of breast cancer treatment rather than the breast cancer itself. Porter But this is an alien concept to most listeners — how can you over diagnose a breast cancer? McCartney Absolutely and this is one of the real issues with screening is that it is counterintuitive.

Marmot Yes I think what Margaret said is incredibly important and I agree completely with the emphasis not just on the benefit but on the harm. Biller-Andorno This is a really complex issue and I think if we want women to make a genuine decision on Switzerland in breast Looking big today for things I think we have to be up front with that.

Porter And who can blame them given that even experts seem to struggle to nail down the scale of the benefits. Adams We differ from most of the other charities in as much as we do not actively promote the screening programme. Marmot I think the issue of uncertainty is being overplayed. Marmot Well no there is such a trial in England Switzerland in breast Looking big today for the moment which is extending screening two or three years younger than 50 and three or four years older than Porter Nikola, as an ethicist, where do you stand — would you put yourself forward for screening if you were invited?

Tue 15 Jul Inside Health Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice. Related Content You may also like.

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